VIDEO: Your Best People May Be Those You Overlook

re you overlooking the talents and skills of someone on your team?

Some star performers may lack the confidence to challenge conventional thinking about themselves and therefore they stay in their given roles.

Those who manage the talent pipeline would be wise to heed the words of composer Ludwig von Beethoven, who wrote, “The barriers are not erected which can say to aspiring talents and industry, ‘Thus far and no farther.’”

Talent wins!

 

First posted on Smart Brief on 4/10/2015

VIDEO: Employees Are Looking for Inspiration

Looking to get to the top of your organization? You’d better work on your motivation skills. That finding comes from a survey by IIC Partners headquartered in London.

As the survey explained, “68 percent of top leaders say they preferred a senior executive who could motivate and inspire others” over the ability to perform well.

When employees see that their boss walks the talk, stands up for them, and has a clear vision, they are motivated to follow. And when they see a leader who believes that his/her job is to serve (rather than being served) they are all the more motivated.

First posted on Smart Brief on 4/24/2015

Make Time for What Matters Before It’s Too Late (HBR)

“In a market that’s become extremely lean and mean… individuals who have tended to be the senior statesmen of their day are sometimes the first to go.”

That comment by Richard Stein, an executive recruiter in New York, should be handed out with diplomas to all newly minted MBAs. On the one hand this is good news for them because it means there is room at the top — but it’s also a warning to these up-and-comers that time flies.

Nelson Schwartz of the New York Times, who spoke to Stein as well as a number of senior leaders in law and financial services firms, reports that the day of involuntary retirement is fast approaching for many senior leaders, many of whom want to hang on to their jobs a while longer.

Reluctance to exit is understandable. Many senior leaders define themselves by their jobs. Senior executives especially grow accustomed to the perks that come with the job. But it’s not the corporate jet they’ll miss the most when they leave. People in power miss being in power. No longer will their phone calls be returned nor will people stop them in the halls to ask their advice. In retiring, they lose what they treasure most: influence.

That is why Stein’s dictum is so pertinent to today’s emerging leaders. Prepare for the future now. There is a misperception that legacy is something reserved for the CEO and his or her team in their last year at the top. No, you begin to create your legacy your first day on the job — and you build on it with every accomplishment over your career. (You also scuff up that legacy with mistakes you make, too.)

 

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First posted on HBR.org 6/17/2011

VIDEO: The Art of the Sound Bite

Anyone who is seeking to persuade, negotiate, or sell something is wise to learn the art of the sound bite.

Good sound bites are brief, pithy statements that sum up what you are trying to say. Short, sweet and to the point.

Proficient users of sound bites are attuned to their usage. This comes from being well read. Keep up with the issues but also read for pleasure.

The purpose of sound bites is simple — help people remember what you said and why you said it. When concise and colorful they reflect the speaker’s personality and amplify the message.

 

First posted on Smart Brief 5/08/2105

How to Instill Purpose (HBR)

A great many organizations invest a significant amount of money in trying to improve themselves. This commitment to getting better is laudable, but many times organizations overlook something within their organization that, when tapped, can sharpen focus, tighten alignment, hone execution, and — in the process — deliver better results. It’s called purpose.

While a veritable tsunami of resources — many of them first-rate — exist to help individuals discover purpose, a mere trickle of resources are available to help organizations discover theirs. This dichotomy led me to research ways to help organizations discover their purpose, and upon discovering it find ways to put it to good use. The result is Lead With Purpose, Giving Your Organization a Reason to Believe in Itself.

Purpose, as savvy leaders know, is the foundation for creating vision, executing the mission, and abiding by the values of an organization. Culture emerges from purposeful organizations, because purpose is what shapes individual’s beliefs and organizational norms. That foundation is essential, because it opens the door for organizations to do four important things, all of which are vital to success:

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First posted on HBR on 11/11/2011

VIDEO: Good Values Spark Good Customer Service

Customer service is something that is a reflection of corporate values.

Good service is a reflection of good values. When an employee says that management makes it easy to do what’s right, it means they are teaching employees to put customers first and, most importantly, backing it up by example.

Organizations whose cultures place a premium on doing what’s right are organizations for which employees want to work and customers want to patronize.

First posted on Smart Brief on 5/22/2015

Compromising When Compromising Is Hard

“If you want to get along, you have to go along,” was the advice legendary Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn gave to members of Congress. It was the mantra by which he governed the House of Representatives.

While Rayburn’s adage is focused on what it takes to succeed within a legislative body, it applies equally to functioning successfully with colleagues in any organization. The nut of Rayburn’s words mean you have to learn to give a little to get something in return: In other words, you have to compromise.

Today, I see too many people who see compromise as a bad thing, an abandonment of principle. In reality, a willingness to compromise is a sign of great conviction: the conviction that the organization comes first.

As easy as that sounds, it is remarkably hard to adopt.

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First posted on 10/12/2013

 

 

VIDEO: Three Steps to Executive Presence

I define leadership presence as the “right stuff of leadership,” and, by doing so, I embrace a holistic concept.

By that definition, presence encompasses conviction, authority and power — and the application of them through a leader’s actions and words.

You might consider presence as defined by three verbs: be, do, review.

Leadership embraces activism; it is the outcome of a purposeful pursuit of goals. Presence gives the leader the wherewithal — authority and resilience — to battle the odds and endure through being, doing, and reflecting.

First posted on 6.05.2015

It’s a Mistake to Make Succession a Horse Race

Who’s next?

That is the question that those involved in succession planning focus upon when considering candidates for senior positions. And while the answer produces a candidate, such a question is too narrow.

A better question would be: who’s best?

While succession planning needs focus on identifying candidates for senior positions, too often the focus is on the horse race — who’s ahead — rather than the organization — who’s best prepared to lead. In a horse race, the focus is on metrics: what an executive has accomplished. In the organizational perspective, the focus is more broad-based — how the executive has achieved what he or she has accomplished.

As much as organizations devote to success planning issues, there are shortcomings. According to a 2012 study by the Institute for Executive Development (IED) survey participants noted three major problems:

  • Lack of a coherent strategy for executive development
  • Lack of a formal process for developing successor candidates; and
  • Lack of candidates ready to take the CEO job.

IED’s suggestions for improvement include clarifying roles and objectives for those involved in succession planning and developing relevant analytics to determine a candidate’s true effectiveness. These two focus on what a candidate has accomplished; a third recommendation — improve the development process — gets to the how the candidate works.

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First posted on HBR.org 2.07.13

 

VIDEO: How to Manage Change the Right Way

No reorganization is ever easy. Especially when you are hired from the outside.

When this occurs, the newly appointed leaders must do what Alan Mulally of Ford and Sergio Marchionne of Fiat Chrysler did when they transformed their organizations. Their example works also works for leaders who have been in their jobs for a while.

  • One, respect tradition.
  • Two, make change urgent.
  • Three, treat employees with respect.
  • Four, insist upon personal accountability.

Managing change is never easy, but when you respect the work and the people who do it you have the opportunity to make change work for the organization.

First posted on Smart Brief on 6/12/2015