The “Just One More” Solution (HBR)

Sixty-two phone calls! That’s what it took a friend of mine, a former executive vice president for national sales, to land a meeting with a new account. He made those calls over a sixteen-month period; each call represented one more attempt to gain the client’s attention. And when he finally met face to face with the client, she thanked him heartily for not giving up. Needless to say my friend’s persistence helped his company win the business.

This story surfaced in a conversation about the need for tenacity in our down economy. It is easy to become discouraged at the deluge of bad news that threatens to swamp us in despair. I am particularly mindful of our twenty-something’s who till now have not endured such heavy weather. [And this is NOT a knock on their work ethic. I have found this generation to be as hard working as any previous one.]

It is up to more experienced managers to show them the right way to conduct themselves. Not with platitudes but with action steps. And so in that spirit I propose the “one more” solution. Consider how you might:

Make one more connection to a customer. Many customers are not buying. Do not let that dissuade you from reaching out and meeting with them. Those who stay close to their customers today will be those who reap the benefits tomorrow.

Make one more attempt to sell an idea upstairs. Tough times are great times to pitch new ideas. Some bosses are naturally resistant to change. But you can make an extra effort to demonstrate the benefits of your great ideas. Be certain to argue the business case. Use the downturn to reinforce your salient propositions.

Make one more effort to engage your employees in the challenges facing your business. Listen to what they are telling you. Learn from what they share with you. Find ways to put some of their ideas into play. Not everything an employee suggests is golden but you demonstrate a willingness to learn if you listen.

And finally, think about what you can do more of in your own job, your own function, and in your own business.

Doing all of these “one more’s” is no guarantee. You or your business may not be viable in today’s tough economic times. Hanging tough might help in an endurance race, but it will not generate new clients or new business if your offerings are not competitive.

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity,” said famed aviator, Amelia Earhart. “The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do.” Tenacity will pay dividends. Perhaps not immediately, but over time it will. Those employees and managers who exercise tenacity today will be those who have earned their resilience. That will hold them in good stead now and in the future.

First posted on 4/16/2009